18 Top Magnet Flowers that Attract Snakes

I’ve always been fascinated by how my garden is a hub of life, not just for the bees and butterflies but for creatures like snakes too. It turns out, the flowers I’ve been planting, such as marigolds, lavender, and sunflowers, do more than just beautify my space; they create a lively ecosystem.

These plants attract a variety of insects and small animals, which, I learned, can make my garden an appealing spot for snakes on the hunt.

flowers that attract snakes
Snake in Grass and Flowers

This discovery has given me a deeper appreciation for the interconnectedness of nature right in my own backyard, where every plant and animal, including the snakes, plays a vital role in the ecosystem’s balance.

Best Flowers that Attract Snakes

As I delved into the list of the best snake-attracting flowers, I was captivated by the role each petal and leaf played in inviting these elegant creatures into my little slice of Eden.

1. Marigold (Tagetes Spp.)

flowers that attract snakes
Marigold (Tagetes Spp.)

Marigolds are vibrant, sun-loving flowers that thrive in almost any soil condition. They’re known for their pest-repellent properties, attracting beneficial insects that feed on garden pests.

  • Habitats: Common in vegetable gardens, borders, and as companion plants, marigolds create a colorful and protective ground cover.
  • Attraction Reason: While repelling certain pests, marigolds can attract insects that serve as food for small animals, which in turn may attract snakes seeking prey.
  • How to Maintain: Regularly remove dead or decaying plant matter to avoid attracting pests that snakes feed on. Plant marigolds near vegetable patches as they repel some pests naturally, reducing the food source for snakes.

2. Lavender (Lavandula Spp.)

Lavender (Lavandula Spp.)

Lavender is prized for its fragrance and purple flowers, attracting bees and butterflies. It thrives in full sun and well-drained soil, and its dense growth can provide shelter for small animals.

  • Habitats: Common in herb gardens, borders, and as a landscape plant for its aromatic leaves and flowers.
  • Attraction Reason: The shelter provided by lavender bushes can attract small animals, which may in turn attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Keep lavender bushes well-pruned and tidy to reduce hiding spots for small animals. Plant lavender in pots or raised beds to limit access for rodents and subsequently, snakes.

3. Sunflower (Helianthus Annuus)

Sunflower (Helianthus Annuus)

Sunflowers are iconic for their large, bright faces that turn to follow the sun. They attract bees, birds, and butterflies, especially when seeds begin to form.

  • Habitats: Often grown in rows in open fields, sunflowers can also be part of garden borders or wildflower gardens.
  • Attraction Reason: The seeds and insects attracted to sunflowers can feed small animals, which may attract snakes to the area.
  • How to Maintain: Regularly collect fallen seeds to prevent attracting rodents and birds that snakes may prey upon. Maintain a clear area around sunflowers to minimize hiding spots for snakes.

4. Zinnia (Zinnia Elegans)

Zinnia (Zinnia Elegans)

Zinnias offer a burst of color from summer into fall, attracting hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees with their vibrant, nectar-rich flowers.

  • Habitats: They’re popular in cutting gardens, borders, and as fillers in beds, providing continuous blooms.
  • Attraction Reason: The pollinators and small animals drawn to zinnias for their flowers and shelter can indirectly attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Keep the area around zinnias clean and free of debris to discourage small animals and insects. Plant zinnias closer to the house or in areas that are frequently trafficked to deter snakes.

5. Cosmos (Cosmos Bipinnatus)

flowers that attract snakes
Cosmos (Cosmos Bipinnatus)

Cosmos flowers with their delicate, daisy-like blooms, attract a variety of pollinators. They’re easy to grow in well-drained soil and full sun.

  • Habitats: Suitable for wildflower meadows and garden borders, cosmos add height and color.
  • Attraction Reason: The biodiversity cosmos support, including insects and sometimes small mammals, can make them attractive to snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Use natural insect repellents to control the insect population without harming the ecosystem. Avoid heavy mulching around cosmos that can provide cover for snakes.

6. Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia Hirta)

flowers that attract snakes
Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia Hirta)

Black-eyed Susans are hardy, drought-tolerant perennials that bloom with bright, yellow flowers, attracting butterflies and bees.

  • Habitats: Common in native plant gardens, meadows, and as border plants, they’re a staple in wildlife-friendly landscapes.
  • Attraction Reason: The insects and small animals attracted to black-eyed Susans for their nectar and shelter can also attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Inspect plants regularly for signs of rodents or excessive insects and address issues promptly. Surround with plants that have snake-repelling properties.

7. Coneflower (Echinacea Spp.)

flowers that attract snakes
Coneflower (Echinacea Spp.)

Coneflowers are beloved for their bold, daisy-like flowers and their ability to attract pollinators like bees and butterflies.

  • Habitats: They thrive in prairie-style plantings, borders, and wildflower gardens, offering a long blooming season.
  • Attraction Reason: The small animals that visit coneflowers for their seeds and the insects they attract can indirectly make these areas appealing to snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Clean up spent flowers and seeds that may attract rodents. Ensure adequate spacing between plants to reduce dense foliage where snakes can hide.

8. Milkweed (Asclepias Spp.)

flowers that attract snakes
Milkweed (Asclepias Spp.)

Milkweed is crucial for monarch butterflies, serving as their primary food source. It attracts a wide range of pollinators with its fragrant blooms.

  • Habitats: Ideal for wildflower gardens and naturalized areas, milkweed supports biodiversity.
  • Attraction Reason: The insects and caterpillars milkweed attracts provide a food source for small animals, which may in turn attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: While attracting monarchs, ensure the area is open and free of dense ground cover that could attract snakes. Keep paths and areas around milkweed clear of overgrowth.

9. Goldenrod (Solidago Spp.)

Goldenrod (Solidago Spp.)

Goldenrods light up the fall landscape with their bright yellow flowers, attracting bees, butterflies, and other pollinators.

  • Habitats: Common in meadows, along roadsides, and in naturalized garden areas, goldenrods are important for late-season pollinators.
  • Attraction Reason: The dense foliage and the variety of insects goldenrods attract can provide hunting grounds for small animals, potentially attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Position goldenrods in areas with less dense vegetation to minimize potential snake shelters. Monitor for pests that could attract snake prey and manage them organically.

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10. Peony (Paeonia Spp.)

Peony (Paeonia Spp.)

Peonies bloom in a variety of lush colors and require well-drained soil and full sun to partial shade. Their dense foliage and the insects they attract for pollination can provide a food source for small animals, which in turn may attract snakes seeking prey.

  • Habitats: Peonies are commonly found in garden borders and flower beds, creating a lush environment.
  • Attraction Reason: The dense growth under the blooms can offer hiding spots for small animals, indirectly attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Ensure good drainage around peonies to discourage rodents that may burrow in moist soil. Trim lower leaves to increase air circulation and reduce damp, shaded areas where snakes might hide.

11. Iris (Iris Spp.)

flowers that attract snakes
Iris (Iris Spp.)

Irises, with their striking flowers, thrive in full sun to partial shade and can vary in habitat from dry land to water margins. They attract pollinators such as bees and can also provide shelter for small animals in their thick foliage.

  • Habitats: These flowers are versatile, growing in both wet and dry conditions, often found in garden beds and by water features.
  • Attraction Reason: The structure of iris plants, especially those in denser, moist garden areas, can attract small fauna, which may in turn attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Be cautious planting irises near water features that may attract frogs or other snake prey. Remove old foliage and spent blooms promptly.

12. Hydrangea (Hydrangea Spp.)

flowers that attract snakes
Hydrangea (Hydrangea Spp.)

Hydrangeas offer large, vibrant blooms that can shade various colors based on the soil’s pH level. They prefer morning sun with afternoon shade and attract a variety of insects, while their dense growth can provide shelter for small animals.

  • Habitats: Often used as ornamental plants in gardens for their large, beautiful flowers.
  • Attraction Reason: The bushy nature of hydrangeas offers excellent cover for small animals, making it a potential site for snakes to hunt.
  • How to Maintain: Trim the underbrush and remove leaf litter to discourage rodents. Consider physical barriers or rough mulch around the base.

13. Lilac (Syringa Vulgaris)

flowers that attract snakes
Lilac (Syringa Vulgaris)

Lilacs are known for their fragrant, colorful flowers that bloom in spring. They attract butterflies and bees, and their dense bushes can be a haven for small animals. Lilacs prefer full sun and well-drained soil.

  • Habitats: Commonly found in gardens and parks, used for their fragrant flowers and as privacy hedges.
  • Attraction Reason: The thick foliage and the insects attracted by the flowers can provide food and shelter for small animals, indirectly attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Ensure lilacs are planted in a way that allows for good airflow to reduce moist, appealing conditions for snake prey. Keep the area under and around lilacs clear.

14. Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea)

Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea)
Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea)

Foxgloves produce tall spikes of tubular flowers that attract bees and hummingbirds. They thrive in partial shade and well-drained soil. The plant’s structure can provide shelter for small fauna.

  • Habitats: Woodland gardens and shaded garden areas are ideal for foxgloves.
  • Attraction Reason: The height and density of foxglove plants can offer hiding spots for small creatures, potentially attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Plant in open areas where snakes are less likely to cross open ground. Address any rodent issues in the vicinity to reduce snake attraction.

15. Hosta (Hosta Spp.)

Hosta (Hosta Spp.)
Hosta (Hosta Spp.)

Hostas are shade-tolerant perennials known for their lush foliage, which comes in various shapes and colors. They attract slugs and snails, which can attract small animals that feed on them, and potentially snakes.

  • Habitats: Ideal for shaded garden spots, under trees, or in woodland gardens.
  • Attraction Reason: The dense leaves provide cover for ground-dwelling creatures, indirectly attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Use eco-friendly methods to control slugs and snails, reducing food sources for snakes. Avoid dense ground covers that provide hiding spots for snakes near hostas.

16. Aster (Aster Spp.)

Aster (Aster Spp.)
Aster (Aster Spp.)

Asters bloom in late summer to fall, offering a late source of nectar for pollinators. They prefer full sun to partial shade and attract butterflies and bees.

  • Habitats: Common in meadows, borders, and wildflower gardens.
  • Attraction Reason: The presence of pollinators and the dense growth of asters can attract small animals, which may attract snakes.
  • How to Maintain: While attracting pollinators, ensure the surrounding garden area is well-maintained to not attract snake prey. Keep asters healthy to avoid attracting pests that could in turn attract snakes.

17. Columbine (Aquilegia Spp.)

Columbine (Aquilegia Spp.)
Columbine (Aquilegia Spp.)

Columbines have unique, bell-shaped flowers and attract hummingbirds and bees. They prefer partial shade and moist, well-drained soil.

  • Habitats: Woodland and rock gardens are typical habitats for columbines.
  • Attraction Reason: The structure of columbine plants provides shelter for insects, which can attract small predators and potentially snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Be mindful of creating habitats that attract small mammals or excessive insects. Regular garden maintenance to keep the area around columbines clear of debris and excess vegetation.

18. Daylily (Hemerocallis Spp.)

Daylily (Hemerocallis Spp.)
Daylily (Hemerocallis Spp.)

Daylilies produce vibrant flowers that bloom for just a day. They are hardy, attract pollinators, and can thrive in a variety of conditions from full sun to partial shade.

  • Habitats: Versatile, they’re found in garden borders, hillsides, and as ground cover.
  • Attraction Reason: The thick foliage at the base of the plants can provide hiding spots for small animals, indirectly attracting snakes.
  • How to Maintain: Use coarse mulch that is less appealing for rodents and snakes. Ensure daylilies are spaced to prevent dense areas where snakes can hide.

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Final Thought

Discovering that the flowers in my garden can attract snakes has profoundly deepened my appreciation for the intricate web of life that flourishes right in my own backyard. This insight has not only expanded my understanding of nature’s delicate balance but has also reminded me of the vital roles every plant and creature plays in sustaining our ecosystems.

It’s a fascinating reminder that my garden is more than a place of beauty—it’s a vibrant habitat that supports and nurtures life in its many forms, including those as misunderstood and essential as snakes.

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